Top 5 “Please, No More!” Books

Yes, I know it’s Top 10 Tuesday, but time and  life restrict me from spending as much time blogging as I’d like.  So, it is what it is.  And I bring you Top 5 Tuesday.  At least for this week.

Any reader worth her salt is aware that publishing works on a pendulum.  A particular “type” of book breaks all known conventions and the author sells a half-dozen million copies and buys a house in the Hamptons AND a house on Mackinac Island.  And then EVERY WRITER EVERYWHERE has to write the same book, only their lead character is named Mary Sue, rather than Katniss.  And publishers herald these new books as “Harry Potter meets The Hunger Games meets The Berenstain Bears” to try to get readers to part with their cash. We’ve all seen it; we’ve all been suckered bought into it.

Well, I say NO MORE!

Here are 5 types of books I refuse to read any more of.

  1. THE DYSTOPIAN

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The dystopian has literally been done to death.  Though I will acknowledge that The Hunger Games did all the heavy lifting to pave the way for this (sub)genre to flourish, I have never been even a casual fan of dystopian novels.  Why, you ask? That’s an excellent question.  Let me tell you.  For one thing, they’re all exactly the same similar. I mean, ok.  We get it – government sucks, the ruling class are all jerks, it’s hard to choose between two cute boys, and murdery girls are super-cool.  How many ways can you think of to write that?  Apparently, loads of ways.  Unfortunately.

2.  THE VAMPIRE

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So, there are some really, really good vampire books out there.  One of my personal favorites is Stephen King’s ‘Salem’s Lot.  It’s subtle and terrifying in its simplicity.  The problem with there being a (very, very) few good ones means they are outnumbered 347893728187:1 by the terrible ones.  I’m not sure how all the authors missed the memo, but vampire ≠ gorgeous, angsty, teenage drama kings.  Also, just fyi, vampires don’t fall in love with spectacularly stupid girls, they suck their blood and leave them for dead.  Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.

3. MEAN GIRLS

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Yes, we know – high school is terrible, teenage boys are tiny demons, and teenage girls are literally hell spawn.  Writers, take note: stop recycling this narrative.  Rather than vilifying high school girls and perpetuating “clique culture”, start focusing on healthy relationships.  Give YA readers examples of EDIFYING female relationships.  (Shout out to Leigh Bardugo @LBardugo for masterfully demonstrating this in her new Wonder Woman: Warbringer.)  Show girls that they don’t need to be intimidated by one another, and that other girls aren’t their competition; rather, they’re their support team.  No, not everyone is going to be nice; not everyone is going to get along.  But this different mindset would go a long way toward changing the trajectory of high school relationships.

4. LOVE TRIANGLES

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So. Many. Love triangles.  If I pick up another YA book with a love triangle, my eyes are going to bleed.  Seriously, it’s hard enough to find one “perfect” dude, but the odds of finding two within the same vicinity of each other?  No shot.  And have you ever noticed, it’s always a girl choosing between two guys, and never the other way around?  I mean, is there ever a legit question about who she’s going to end up with, anyway?  Of course Bella was going to choose Edward; Simon didn’t have a prayer with Clary once Jace stepped into the picture; and anyone who thought Mare was going to pick Maven when she could have Cal is out of their mind. Though I don’t object to the idea of a ❤ triangle, I have yet to find one that’s well done and actually leaves me wondering who our heroine will choose.

5. SPECIAL SNOWFLAKE

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You know the one.  (Cue movie trailer voice guy.) “In a special land where everyone is special and has special powers of speciality, SHE is born ordinary. With brown hair and brown eyes and nothing particularly attractive about her, she has no specialness.  UnTIL, ONE DAY, she discovers she is a Super Special Secret Princess and her destiny is to, in the most special way possible, SAVE THE WORLD!” Ugh.  Give me a break.  So over it.

Ha.  Top 10 5 Tuesday turned into a bit of a personal rant.  It happens.  But, as you loyal and brilliant readers know, this is just a drop in the bucket that dips into the magical wishing well full of books I ❤ and adore.

What types of books are you completely over?

Top 10 Tuesday: Top 10 Coolest Book Characters

***Due to the fact that Skynet possessed my computer yesterday, Top Ten Tuesday is taking place on Wacky-Woo Wednesday***

If you’re at all like me, you judge books based on how interesting the setting is, how original the plot is, and how likable (or unlikeable) the characters are.  Some writers are extremely gifted in one or two of these areas; the BEST writers are gifted in all three.  It takes all three of these elements to make a story, and if one of the elements is weak, then more times than not, the story is weak, too.

I like character-driven stories.  I can deal with a setting I don’t particularly like, or a plot that seems a little simplistic, if the characters are memorable and capture my interest.  They have to make me care.  I have to be invested in the characters – in their lives, or in their deaths, in their successes, or in their failures.  I like flawed characters because they seem more real to me, and I like strong characters because they are inspiring.

And they get double points when they’re awesome.  Like these TOP 10 COOLEST BOOK CHARACTERS.

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JAMES BOND

Say what you want about the British secret agent and his philandering ways, but when it comes to coolness factor, this dude has it times ten.  He’s always in trouble with someone, be it SPECTRE, Blofeld, Goldfinger, or M, and he’s always got a plan to get out of it.  Even if that means blowing up an entire city and walking away from the explosion without looking back at it…

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HOLLY GOLIGHTLY

This freewheeling lady-about-town does what she wants, when she wants, and with whomever she wants, and doesn’t care what anyone has to say about it.  She is unapologetic about her motives and her material desires, and doesn’t try to hide the truth behind anything she does.  She sleeps half the day, socializes half the night, and can climb out of bed and look stunning in 16.5 seconds.

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HARRY DRESDEN

As Chicago’s only wizard for hire, Dresden kind of has the market on cool – at least in the Windy City.  Dresden is a complete misfit, and has quite possibly the worst luck of anyone, EVER.  But that doesn’t stop him from wielding magic like a boss, and taking down some of the worst criminals out there – human and non.  He bucks every system imaginable – the law, the magicians’ Council – and somehow always manages to come out on top – even when he’s dead for a while.

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MR. FOX

Tricksy, clever Hobbitses foxes are all sorts of awesome.  Especially this one.  He’s like a furry Danny Ocean, complete with a criminal crew.  He wants to provide for his family, and is willing to risk everything to make sure they have what they need.  And then, just as importantly, he makes sure those around him have what they need, too.  He recognizes that the critter community is stronger if they work together, rather than separately.  A valuable lesson.

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AMELIA PEABODY

Peabody puts all other book characters to shame.  She’s a proper lady, but can sip sherry, run an archaeological site, raise kids, keep her husband out of trouble, and knock someone out with her parasol, all before morning tea time.  She is forward-thinking and clever, brave, and a wonderful problem-solver.   She has the spirit of an adventurer at a time when it wasn’t strictly fashionable for women to go gallivanting around the globe – but gallivant she does, and fearlessly.

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SHERLOCK HOLMES

The brilliant, borderline mad Holmes is complex, interesting, and slightly frightening.  He is willing to go to unbelievable lengths to find the solution to his cases, even if it means putting himself (and, by association, Dr. Watson) in grave danger.  His skill at reasoning sets him apart from other detective characters, and the fact that he is so unabashedly confident in his position as the world’s best consulting detective is an outpouring of his arrogance – something he sees as less of a character flaw, and more of a fact.

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LUCY PEVENSIE

It takes undaunted courage to be the youngest in a family, and go on an adventure without your older siblings.  It takes even more courage to believe something they don’t, and to stand up for that belief.  Add to that running for your life, opposing a witch, going on a sea voyage, ruling as queen, and fighting a battle, and you are just scratching the surface of things Lucy does.  She may not always have complete confidence in herself, but she follows her heart and does what she believes is right, and, in the end, is a heroine.

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ROLAND DESCHAIN

The last Gunslinger.  He’s a haunting figure, and plays out the journey of the choice between good and evil.  His decisions are rarely easy; often they are brutal.  But he makes them anyway, often at great cost to himself.  Obviously mentally scarred, he deals with loss the way he sees best – practically and coolly – but this means he doesn’t “deal”, and at times, his demons come back to haunt him.  Heroic by nature, he is still flawed, and that gives him layers of complication.

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ANNE SHIRLEY

They say a picture is worth a thousand words…  Anne is bold.  She is confident.  She is brilliant.  And she doesn’t allow her status as an orphan to ever make her feel like she is less than worthy.  She knows what she wants, and she works ceaselessly to accomplish her goals.  She dares to dream, and is willing to work to make her dreams come true, too.  Brave, Anne is always up for a challenge (or a dare), up for travel, and up for a new experience, all of which provide her with fodder for her boundless imagination.

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ELIZABETH BENNET

A free-thinking lady who wishes to marry for love, rather than money and security, Lizzie is an anomaly.  She possesses a vitality and zest for life that allow her to see the absurdity in the social conventions of her time.  She is slightly impertinent in her opinions, and does not strictly abide by “acceptable” social ideas.  She does not see the “upper” class as being better than her – she knows her worth, and is unwilling to settle for anything less than she knows she deserves.   Also, she has a wicked-snarky-sassy sense of humor.

So there you have it!  Though there are countless other shady-cool characters in literature, these are some of my favorites.  Who are some of yours?  Let me know, and we can chat!

Thursday we’ll talk about something truly terrifying – a writer’s current work-in-progress…  DUH- DUh-Duh…

 

 

Coffee Break: ARC Reactor

It’s no secret that I’m an unapologetic nerd.  I love to read, I love school, I hang out in libraries and bookstores, I am an avid member of many fandoms, I like the Stars (Trek, Wars, Gate, Battle, etc.), and super heroes.  You name it, I can check off the nerd box.  Luckily, my interests mesh well together.  I like being able to recognize the threads that connect the things I love.  So, when I say I consider myself an “ARC Reactor” it makes me laugh like a dork at my own joke.  Keep reading, and you’ll laugh, too – either at me for being hilarious, or with me at my extreme level of clever.  Either way, mission: accomplished.

You see, though I super-duper ❤ Batman, deep down I’m really a Marvel girl.  And Iron Man is one of my favorite Marvel super heroes, mostly because, as far as I’m concerned, Iron Man is just a brighter, flashier version of Batman.  (Those of you who are hurling tomatoes at me via your computer screens right now, just keep in mind that you’re not actually squishing me with them, and you should take it easy on your electronics.)  Hear me out.  Bruce Wayne = bazillionaire.  Tony Stark = bazillionaire.  Bruce Wayne engineers his suit.  Tony Stark engineers his suit.  Bruce Wayne is a second-generation operator of his family’s business; Tony Stark, same.  So, you see what I mean.  That said, there’s one thing that Iron Man has that Batman doesn’t (besides the bromance with Captain America) – the ARC reactor.

The ARC reactor is what keeps Tony Stark alive.  Without going into too much detail and boring you (crazy) non-comic book fans, here’s a brief explanation (inhales giant breath): Stark had shrapnel in his chest that was traveling toward his heart and would have killed him but Stark modifies one of his father’s inventions called the ARC reactor and shoves it into his chest cavity to suck the shrapnel back away from his heart and keep it from exploding.  (Whew!)  The ARC reactor also supplies the power for the Iron Man suits.  So, essentially, for Tony Stark, ARC reactor = life.

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One of the many hats I wear is my book blogger beanie.  I love books, I  love reading books, and I love writing about books.  (Psst, sources say that’s the main reason this blog exists.)  If I could make a living reading and writing about books, this world would be an awesome place.  Alas, that’s not the case.  BUT, that doesn’t mean I can’t try to make that wish come true.  You see…

A few months before publishers release finished, gorgeous copies of books they hope will become best sellers, they release what are called Advance Readers Copies (or ARCs).  Getting an ARC is rare, because publishers only print a small number of them, and only distribute them to people they think will do them justice, like book bloggers with a large following, some librarians, and individuals they know can promote sales.  So for book bloggers like myself, getting an ARC of a popular author’s upcoming release is like finding a Golden Ticket.

The book community is an enthusiastic and opinionated one.  Also, they possess a level of devotion to their favorite authors that’s slightly creepy.  So the last two or three months before an author’s newest book is released is like pure torture for any fan.  They are desperate for any scrap of information about the new book.  This is where book bloggers with ARCs have the power.  (Right now, in my head, I see Prince Adam hoisting aloft the Power Sword and yelling “I have the POWER” while morphing into He-Man.  Yep, total nerd.)

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It’s true.  If you’re a book blogger with an ARC of the next big thing, readers will flock to your blog to read your review.  And what does every book blogger want?  READERS!  And what gets the readers?  ARCs!  So, what does ever book blogger want to do?  React to ARCs!  (You see where I’m going with this.)  So, essentially, for book bloggers, ARCs = life.

I was fortunate enough to attend the American Library Association Annual conference at the end of June, where I was able to acquire several of these coveted ARCs.  (You can read my post about that experience here.)  And every now and then, I win one through a Goodreads giveaway, as I did Hunting Prince Dracula by Kerri Maniscalco, which I recently reviewed here.  But I currently have a nice little pile of ARCs by authors I love, that I am honored to be able to review.  Thus making me a – wait for it – ARC reactor.  Bahahahahahahaha!

Monday will feature a mini-review July wrap-up post, and Tuesday, as always, an awesome Top 10 Tuesday post!

Peace out!

Coffee Break: The Case for YA Literature

I have a confession to make: I read a lot of YA (young adult, for those of you who are wondering) literature.  Ok, ok, maybe it’s not a confession, since if you all are paying attention, you know that already.  But it’s true, and I’m not ashamed of it.

I actually have an extremely eclectic reading taste – I’m game for almost anything, save terrifying, bloody horror books, and Amish fiction.  This is because I ❤ books, I appreciate authors and want to support their heroic work, and I like to learn things about all the things (except stabby, murdery psychopaths and sweet, sweet Amish love).

I have always been a #reader, but over the years have read for different purposes.  As a child, I read because I enjoyed it; as a student, I read because I had to; as an adult I still read because I have to, but not because it’s required – rather, it’s a compulsion.  It’s not for a grade, but for the soul.  Because I’m old now, and can do what I want (*insert sarcastic laughter here), I read what I want.  My time is limited, and I don’t see the point in torturing myself by wasting precious hours reading something I don’t enjoy.  I enjoy YA literature.

“But, why?” you ask.  “YA lit is for, you know, teenagers.”  I respectfully disagree.  Saying that is like saying teenagers shouldn’t read contemporary fiction, or nonfiction because those genres aren’t written to target a teen audience.  YA literature is a unique creature unto itself, in that it can be about anything.  YA literature is not tied to genre limitations; is is not stifled by literary conventions.  YA authors aren’t afraid to put it all out there and write about cyborg Cinderellas or about children hunting other children to amuse evil adults; they aren’t afraid to take risks.  They aren’t afraid of what their audience may think – they know kids are up for anything.

So why is YA literature thought of as being less than

Currently, YA literature is experiencing an explosion in popularity.  YA books are ending up on best seller lists; they are taking up huge amounts of space in bookstores; they are being turned into blockbuster films.  Are there really that many teens reading books?  NO.  While there are a lot of teens who read, the explanation for what can only be called the YA Phenomenon is this: adults are reading YA books.  Why?  BECAUSE YA BOOKS TALK ABOUT ALL THE THINGS that adult books don’t.  Here’s an example: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, published by HarperCollins this past February, is about an inner-city girl who witnesses her childhood best friend shot and killed by a police officer while unarmed, and the implications and fallout of that situation.  It places the reader squarely within the story, and provides a perspective most readers may never get.  No AF (adult fiction) books are talking about this topic – something that is very timely and relevant.  Yet Thomas is brave enough to do so, and to an audience that is open-minded enough to consider that other perspective.  Another example is Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.  This book follows Junior as he moves from the reservation to the suburbs where he navigates the minefield that is trying to make friends while battling social stereotypes.  This book highlights specific identity issues facing indigenous peoples, and resonates with many who feel marginalized.  *Looks around – AF?  Anything on this?  No?

The examples I used here are two contemporary novels, set in reality.  Many YA authors choose to tackle these issues, as well, only in a fantasy context.  Veronica Roth’s Divergent series is a good bellwether for this: she highlights society and class, as well as identity, but sets the story in a post-apocolyptic world.  YA books deal with questions of drug culture, suicide, death, violence, identity, sex, acceptance, family, relationships, mental health, etc., ad infinitum.  You name it, there’s a YA book that talks about it.  YA is valuable because people can relate to the books, no matter how old the reader is.

YA books also provide:

Escapism – Most people don’t want to sit down, crack open a book, and read about depressing things.  They want to, at least for a little while, bail on their real life.  Settings in YA books are often fantastical and foreign, and allow readers to step away from their lives and experience something that speaks to their imagination, rather than their reason.

Excitement – Let’s get real here for a minute.  There are some AF books that are boring AF (see what I did there?).  YA books, no matter the genre, are always moving.  Because teens are always moving.  There is drama; there is action – and most of the time, the two are happening at the same time.

Strong Characters – In case you haven’t met one for a while, and need to be reminded, let me point out: teens are opinionated.  They are learning, they are developing their own thoughts and world views, and they want to see the same thing in their book hero(ine)s.  Many YA books are written in 1st person point of view, so the reader hears the character’s voice specifically.  The voices are strong and sure, and inspire that same confidence.  Additionally, there are many, many strong female characters in YA lit, who represent some of the most individual voices in literature of any genre.

Hope – For all the “issues” found in YA literature, rarely do things end on a negative note.  This is because the authors realize they are writing for the next generation, who have a lot to look forward to.  Soul-crushing situations are resolved, hurts are mended, and the bad guy is rightfully punished.  Teens are creative and they’re smart, and they have a habit of looking forward, rather than backward; YA authors do a wonderful job of giving them something bright to move toward.

It crushes my soul when I hear critics (and by critics, I mean other readers) bash YA literature as “shallow” or “dumbed down” derivatives of AF.  Because this is not the case.  YA literature is just as sophisticated and important as every other genre of book out there, because it does its job: it speaks to its audience.  And it’s audience listens, and loves it.

Just one last thought: if it wasn’t for YA authors, we wouldn’t have Harry Potter; we wouldn’t have Katniss Everdeen; we wouldn’t have Anne Shirley; we wouldn’t have Bilbo Baggins.  Some of the most iconic and beloved literary characters ever created are products of YA literature.

So next time someone scoffs at you because you choose to spend your time reading a YA book now and again (or always), don’t be ashamed to stand up for those authors who choose to create iconic characters and memorable settings, and who choose to face the hard issues head-on and try to make sense of them.

(All those gorgeous covers, though…)

 

Top 10 Reading Confessions

So, reading is kinda my thing, and has been since I was a very small child.  I grew up in a rural area, and it was just my parents, sister, our animals, and I on 250 acres of farm and woods.  (Don’t get me wrong – we had friends and went on trips and vacations and whatnot, but our everyday life was quiet, and a little isolated.)  I read a lot.  Those were the days – I could get up and get my chores done, and then disappear into my tree fort for the rest of the day with my book and a sack lunch.  Reading was part of my daily life; I always had a book in my hand, no matter where I was.  And that has not changed.  If I could make a living as a professional reader, I’d sign up in a heartbeat.  (Publishers, you hear that?  I’m available.  Just so you know.)  My husband says I have a “problem”; I say it’s a gift.  (Husband is wrong, btw.  Just in case that wasn’t already clear.)

When one reads upwards of 100 books a year, it’s inevitable that one will develop some reading tricks and preferences.  It’s also inevitable that said reader has habits, loves, and dislikes when it comes to reading, and to books in general.  BUT not everyone is willing to talk about these most guarded of secrets.  I am.  I’m here to confess.  And this is what I have to say.  (You may want to take notes.)  Side note: there’s no order to these – number 1 isn’t any more important than number 10 – it’s just how I thought of them.

  1. If a book is really good, I cast its movie in my head.  In addition to books, I like movies.  Correction: I like well done movies.  So when a book captures my attention/imagination/love, I want to experience it in as many forms as I can.  I think this also comes from me being a writer, and a visual learner; when I develop characters in my own work, I find a photo of someone who resembles what the character looks like in my head.  Sometimes it is an actor/actress; sometimes it is a celebrity.  It may have to do with a character they once played, or it may be that they simply look the part.  It’s a habit, and when I read, I assign faces to characters.  It happens, deal with it.  (You, over there, you who doesn’t think that the movie is ever better than the book and that movies aren’t worthy of book inspiration – all I’m going to say is: The Prestige.)  I love it when books are made into movies, and I have no problem when the movies is different from the book.  “Sacrilege!” you cry.  “More versions of what I love,” I respond.
  2. When I see huge chunks of exposition, I skim.  Some description/exposition is completely fine.  Entire pages of it?  Ain’t nobody got time for ‘dat.  I loathe info dumps.  This may be why I am staunchly against most prologues.  Yes, some authors (Clive Cussler and Maggie Stiefvater come to mind) use prologues masterfully; most do not.  I find prologues to be a convenient way for writers to be lazy, and rather than find creative ways to fill in backstory or detail, they rely on a prologue to do it for them.  Same goes for huge paragraphs of description within the narrative.  Bo-ring.  Give me the info in dialogue or in small bits, not in super-size, coma-inducing boulders.  Show me; don’t tell me.
  3. I judge a book by its cover.  Well, initially, anyway.  I am a visual person, and covers are the parts of the books that I can see.  Books with pretty/interesting covers draw my attention; books with terrible/boring covers repel me.  Don’t ever believe that you can’t judge a book by its cover.  Publishers know that covers sell books.  When they want a book to do well, they give it a great cover.  That’s not to say they intentionally sabotage books by giving them horrible covers, but actually I think they kind of do.  I like buying books that will look nice on my shelves.  Call me shallow, but I don’t want to spend my life looking at ugly books.
  4. I blame the dark circles under my eyes on my kids, but it’s really from staying up until four in the morning reading.  I’m not sure what else there is to say about this.  If I was  a “plugged in” parent, I would park myself on the couch with my Kindle while my kids are playing and read while they imagine.  But I don’t want their first memories of me to be me distracted by my phone and missing the important stuff.  I’m gone during the day at work – surrounded by books all day at the library – so I do my best to stay off my devices until they’re in bed.  So, night time is my reading time.  This means that sometimes I do not sleep.  At all.  (Ok, reading time cuts into sleeping time a lot.)  And I’m ok with that.
  5. I don’t use book marks – I dog-ear my pages like a savage.  And I don’t care who knows.  I don’t have time to worry about trying to remember where I put my book mark.  Not only that, I use my books.  I read them, they bang around in my bag, they ride with me in my cars.  Not often do they remain in pristine condition.  They are well-loved. Plus, I like dogs.
  6. I hate 1st person present POV.  When I pick up a book and see it’s written in that tense, 9 out of 10 times I put it back down, no matter how pretty the cover is.  There are few authors who can pull off this combination of tense and POV well, and I mostly find it to be pretentious and a cry for attention.  The character’s voice has to be one I really, really like, because it means I’m stuck for x-number of pages in this character’s limited, immediate point of view.  There aren’t a lot of characters I like that much.
  7. I dislike book snobs.  You know the type.  “Well, I only read literary fiction“, or “I only read nonfiction.”  OR… “Oh, I don’t read YA books – they’re for kids.”  Ugh.  A good book is a good book is a good book.  It doesn’t matter who wrote it, what genre it falls into, or who its intended audience was.  I feel a little bit sorry for people who are so narrow-minded that they won’t read outside their preferred taste.  Think of all the things they’re missing!  And what makes it worse is when that same person looks down on others for what they read.  Different people read different books – that’s a fact.  My books aren’t any less legit than your books.  And my books just might teach you something.  Now, that’s not to say I think people who always read the same types of books are wrong; people read what they like, and that’s completely fine.  But what’s not completely fine is when people judge others for what they read, or don’t read.
  8. I am a book hoarder.  I believe the correct term for my “condition” is bibliophile.  I have books everywhere.  Towers, piles, shelves, baskets, crates – you name it, it houses/holds/displays books.  Books bring me comfort, they give me peace.  I enjoy reading them, I enjoy looking at them, I enjoy shopping for them, I enjoy adding them to my towers/piles/shelves/baskets/crates.  (*whispers while looking over her shoulder, “Some books I even own multiple copies of.“)  And some day, if I go missing and can’t be found, it’ll be because one of my book towers collapsed and buried me beneath it.  I may suffocate, but I’d consider it a good death.
  9. Sometimes I write in my books.  Yes, it’s true.  I spent enough time as a student that I’m ok with this.  I have thoughts while I read, and there are times I want to refer back to those thoughts.  I don’t want to have to expend the brain power to try to remember which of my 1,236,735 notebooks I wrote said thought in.  No, I want it right there for ready reference.  When I buy used books, the first thing I do is look for notes made by previous owners.  I ❤ reading the thought others have had about books, as well.  (See: “Marginalia” by Billy Collins – a magnificent poem about just this subject, courtesy of Poemhunter.com.)
  10. Most of the time, I prefer books to people.  This is probably why I always have either a book or my Kindle with me at all times – so if there are too many humans around, and it looks like I might be drawn into a conversation, I can hide my face.   That is not to say I dislike people in general – I just dislike drama in all its negative forms, and with people comes drama.  So when the dude in front of me at the bank starts to get belligerent because he doesn’t understnad why he can’t go back into the vault to look at his money, and looks at me for support, he’ll find me oblivious.  “Nothing to see here – busy in Narnia.  Thank you, move along.”

Yes, it’s all true, Dear Blog Follower.  I am a beastly reader.  And unapologetic about it.  You know why?  Because I know you have reading confessions of your own.

Let me know what some of them are!